Speakers

Professor Gillian Leng CBE

Session: NICE and the future of health and care and In conversation: NICE Chair and Chief Executive Gill Leng

Professor Gillian Leng CBE
Chief Executive
NICE

Gillian is the Chief Executive at NICE and a visiting professor at King's College London. Gillian trained in medicine at Leeds, and then spent several years researching the epidemiology of peripheral vascular disease at Edinburgh University. She was involved in the Cochrane Collaboration as it first became established, and still contributes as an editor to the EPOC Group (Effective Practice and Organisation of Care). She specialised in public health medicine and worked as a consultant before moving to NICE in 2001. At NICE, Gillian has been responsible for the initial set up and running of the clinical guidelines programme, for establishing the NICE implementation function, and for setting up NHS Evidence. More recently she has been responsible for the transfer of the National Prescribing Centre into NICE, for establishing the NICE accreditation programme, and for new work on Quality Standards across health and social care.


 

Meindert Boysen

Session chair

Meindert Boysen
Director, Centre for Health Technology Evaluation
NICE

Meindert is Director of the Centre for Health Technology Evaluation at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). He was previously responsible for running NICE’s technology appraisal and highly specialised technologies programmes, Meindert has a strong track record in health technology evaluation, occupying a senior technical and leadership role in NICE’s drug appraisal programme.

Before joining NICE in 2004 Meindert worked for Eli Lilly in the Netherlands, and for the King’s Fund in London after graduating with an MSc in Health Policy Planning and Financing from the London School of Economics & Political Sciences.

Meindert is currently on the Board of Directors for The International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR), 2017 – 2020 and is chair of the ISPOR Audit committee.

 


 

Martin Knapp

Session: Follow the evidence – but where does it lead?

Martin Knapp
Professor of Social Policy and Director of the Personal Social Services Research Unit
London School of Economics and Political Science

Martin Knapp is Professor of Health and Social Care Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), based in the Health Policy Department. He is also a Professorial Research Fellow in the Care Policy and Evaluation Centre, LSE. Since 2009, Martin has been Director of the School for Social Care Research, part of the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). His main research areas are social care, child and adult mental health, dementia and autism, with much of his work using economic arguments and evidence to inform policy discussion and influence practice development.

 


 

Sarada Chunduri-Shoesmith

Session: Transforming care for people with learning disabilities and behaviour that challenges

Sarada Chunduri-Shoesmith
Associate Director
NICE 

 


 

Nick Crabb

Session: The post-Brexit world

Nick Crabb
Programme Director – Scientific Affairs
NICE

Nick had a 20 year career in analytical science, process technology and general management in the chemical, pharmaceutical and contract laboratory industries prior to joining NICE as the associate director for the Diagnostics Assessment Programme in 2010. Nick was responsible for the establishment and management of the programme. In 2014 Nick was appointed Programme Director for Scientific Affairs where he oversees NICE Scientific Advice, the Science Policy and Research programme and the NICE Office for Market Access.


 

Dr Mark Kroese

Session: Bringing innovation to genomic medicine  

Dr Mark Kroese
Diagnostics Advisory Committee, NICE
Director, PHG Foundation

 


 

Professor Anthony Wierzbicki

Session: Over-diagnosis: intervening too soon and too much?

Professor Anthony Wierzbicki
Chair, Guideline Committee on Hypertension, NICE
Consultant in Metabolic Medicine and Chemical Pathology, Guy's & St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

 


 

Dr Paul Chrisp

Session: Follow the evidence – but where does it lead?

Dr Paul Chrisp
Director, Centre for Guidelines 
NICE

Paul has been with NICE since March 2009, where he was responsible for setting up the Institute’s accreditation programme for guideline developers, and more recently was Programme Director of the Medicines and Technologies Programme. Before joining NICE, Paul spent over 20 years in international medical publishing and communications, focusing on evidence to aid healthcare decision making and the adoption of new medicines. Paul trained as a pharmacist and is a member of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society.


 

Dr Angela George

Session: Bringing innovation to genomic medicine  

Dr Angela George
Diagnostics Advisory Committee specialist committee member for Lynch syndrome guidance, NICE
Consultant in Oncogenetics,  Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust 

 


 

Berkeley Greenwood

Session: NICE technologies guidance – future-proofing our methods

Berkeley Greenwood
Founder and Managing Director
Decideum

Following several years of working in the public affairs field, Berkeley began to develop his market access credentials in the early 1990s, eventually setting up his own consultancy - Decideum.

He advises on highly regulated areas of healthcare policy, notably in the fields of HTA and commissioning, dealing extensively with bodies such as NHSE England, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and the Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC).

Berkeley has worked on secondment to a variety of senior in-house market access roles most recently at Novo Nordisk and then at Shire UK and Ireland.

He has wide experience advising on all aspects of the work of the various NICE committees and work-streams and he has trained numerous organisations for their appearances in front of these bodies over the past twenty years.


 

Richard Vize

Session chair

Richard Vize
Director
Public Policy Media Ltd

Richard Vize (@RichardVize) has been a commentator on public policy and public services reform for over 25 years. He is a columnist for the Guardian Healthcare Network, contributes to the British Medical Journal and works with a range of organisations across health and local government.

Richard is a former editor of both Health Service Journal and Local Government Chronicle, and was head of communications at regulator Ofsted. He and his teams have won a number of awards.

He is a trustee of the whistleblowing charity Public Concern at Work. Richard’s passions are photography, independent travel and political history.


Dr Paul Dimmock

Session: Health, care and the climate emergency

Dr Paul Dimmock
Health Technology Assessment Adviser
NICE 

Dr Paul Dimmock is an ex-academic trained in chemistry and the physical sciences in the UK and US. He moved into healthcare research and has published systematic reviews and meta-analyses notably in the area of gynaecology, as well as working in medical education and statistical research. He has worked at NICE for 6 years in the Medical Technologies Evaluation Programme, focussing on advice and guidance on medical devices, diagnostics and digital technologies, including their environmental impact.


 

Helen Knight

Session: NICE technologies guidance – future-proofing our methods

Helen Knight
Programme Director, Centre for Health Technology Evaluation
NICE 

 


 

Conference Chair: Dr Phil Hammond

Conference Chair

Dr Phil Hammond

Dr Phil Hammond can talk seriously or humorously, and usually both, about any health and lifestyle topic. He has been an NHS doctor for 31 years, a comedian for 29 years, a BBC broadcaster for 28 years and Private Eye’s medical correspondent for 26 years. He qualified as a doctor in 1987, was a part time GP for 20 years, spent 5 years in sexual health and currently works in an NHS team helping young people with chronic fatigue. Phil presented five series of Trust Me, I’m a Doctor on BBC2, and has appeared many times on Have I Got News For You, the News Quiz, the Now Show and Countdown.

Phil has been a Lecturer in Medical Communication at the Universities of Birmingham and Bristol. As a journalist, he broke the story of the Bristol heart scandal in 1992, and gave evidence to the subsequent Public Inquiry. In 2012, Phil and Andrew Bousfield were shortlisted for the Martha Gellhorn Prize for investigative journalism for their Private Eye special report on the shocking treatment of NHS whistle-blowers, Shoot the Messenger. He has twice been named in the top 100 NHS Clinical Leaders by the Health Service Journal, and was voted Teacher of the Year by the medical students of Birmingham University.

Phil has presented his own BBC Radio Bristol show for 11 years, combining health, hope and happiness. With David Spicer, he has written 5 series of the medico-political satire ‘Polyoaks’ for Radio 4, and five books including ‘Staying Alive’ and ‘Sex, Sleep or Scrabble?.’ Phil was half of the award-winning comedy junior doctor double act Struck Off and Die with Tony Gardner, and has done four UK solo comedy tours, teaching audiences how to pleasure themselves sensibly and take the pressure off the NHS. His new show, ‘Happy Birthday NHS?’ celebrates its 70th birthday and provides a road map for its salvation. It toured in 2018.


 

Professor Mary Dixon-Woods

Session: The science and art of quality improvement 

Professor Mary Dixon-Woods
Director

The Healthcare Improvement Studies (THIS) Institute

Mary Dixon-Woods FAcSS FMedSci is Director of THIS Institute and The Health Foundation Professor of Healthcare Improvement Studies at the University of Cambridge and Co-Editor-in-Chief of BMJ Quality and Safety. She is a Professorial Fellow at Homerton College, Cambridge, an NIHR Senior Investigator, and Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and the Royal College of General Practitioners.  She served on the National Advisory Group on the Safety of Patients in England in 2013 and the review of information technology in the NHS led by Professor Bob Wachter, which reported in 2016. Mary was the Harveian Orator for the Royal College of Physicians in 2018.

 


 

James Bullion

Session: Workshop – putting guidelines at the heart of integrated care

James Bullion
Executive Director Adult Social Services
Norfolk County Council

 


 

Dr Paul Catchpole

Session: Accelerated Access Collaborative – the big picture

Dr Paul Catchpole
Value and Access Director
Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry 

Paul has worked in the healthcare, local government and pharmaceutical sectors for over 30 years. He began his career as an NHS researcher and then held a number of NHS management posts before working on a wide range of UK and international management consultancy assignments at PriceWaterhouseCoopers.  After moving to Roche, he led work on national reimbursement of medicines, health economics, strategic pricing and market access. 

Paul’s policy work at the ABPI over the last 10 years includes all aspects of medicines evaluation, health technology assessment, pricing and reimbursement, market access, the Cancer Drugs Fund, biosimilar medicines, EAMS and the Accelerated Access Collaborative.  He has led work on shaping and evolving value, access and uptake policy for the pharmaceutical industry in the UK for the last four PPRS negotiations, including the current Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing and Access.

He has a Ph.D in healthcare information systems and is a Member of the British Computer Society and a Chartered Information Technology Professional.

 


 

Dominic Pivonka

Session: Getting the right data

Dominic Pivonka
Head of Health Technology Assessments & Pricing
AbbVie

 


 

Dr Sebastian Vollmer

Session: Intelligent Machines – harnessing the power of algorithms

Dr Sebastian Vollmer
Programme Co-Director for Health
Alan Turing Institute

 


 

Dr Samuel Finnikin

Session: Over-diagnosis: intervening too soon and too much?

Dr Samuel Finnikin
Institute of Applied Health Research
University of Birmingham

Dr Finnikin is a GP in Sutton Coldfield and a researcher at the University of Birmingham. He is interested in how we can better use shared decision making in practice to reduce unwarranted variation and the harms of overmedicalisation. He is a member of the RCGP Preventing Overdiagnosis group and a fellow for Evidence and Values with the college.


 

Jeanette Kusel

Session: Getting the right data

Jeanette Kusel
Director, Scientific Advice
NICE 

Jeanette joined NICE as Director for Scientific Advice in November 2018. She is responsible for the stewardship and growth of the NICE Scientific Advice business unit, which includes all aspects of business development, management, project delivery and governance. Jeanette takes an active role in the sign-off and quality assurance of work across all services offered by the team. She also chairs many of the national and parallel scientific advice meetings for medical device and pharmaceutical product developers.

Previously Jeanette held the positions of Head of HTA and Health Economics and Scientific Director at Costello Medical, a consultancy within the life science sector. She has broad research interests across different methods for health technology evaluation and has previously worked on clinical trial design, health economic modelling and quality of life measurement.

Jeanette studied undergraduate natural sciences at the University of Cambridge and postgraduate health economics at the University of York.

 


 

Alan Cribb

Session: Intelligent Machines – harnessing the power of algorithms

Alan Cribb
Professor of Bioethics and Educations
King's College London

 


 

Deborah O'Callaghan

Session: Workshop – putting guidelines at the heart of integrated care

Deborah O'Callaghan
Associate Director (Midlands and East)
Public Health Sector Lead

NICE

Deborah O’Callaghan is the Associate Director of the NICE Field Team in the Midlands and East.  She is also the Sector Lead for Public Health.  Working with health and care systems and organisations, her role is to support the use NICE guidance and Quality Standards to achieve high quality care and improvements in health and wellbeing.  Deborah is committed to collaborating with partner organisations including other national bodies to ensure a cohesive package of support is available to organisations across the region.

Deborah has worked at NICE for 10 years, prior to which she held a variety of strategy, redesign and quality improvement roles within the NHS and social care sector.  More recent posts include Associate Director of Strategic Development in a London PCT and Director of a London Cardiac Network.


 

 

Dr Judith Richardson

Session: Tackling big killers

Dr Judith Richardson
Deputy Medical Director & Programme Director, Quality & Leadership
NICE 

 


 

Matt Sydes

Session: Getting the right data

Matt Sydes
Professor of Clinical Trials & Methodology
University College London

Matt is responsible for leading the unit's Trial Conduct Methodology activities as well as teams conducting research in prostate cancer and osteosarcoma. Matt has a particular interest in improving clinical trial conduct, particularly around: the use of routinely-collected electronic health records (EHR) to support and run trials with Health Data Research UK; running trials with a view to regulatory use and submission; proportionate and efficient trial monitoring; clinical trial data sharing; communication of trial findings; adaptive and efficient designs for late-phase trials, including in uncommon conditions; and the functioning of Data Monitoring Committees. On this, he was involved in the DAMOCLES project which set standards for (independent) Data Monitoring Committees and led to the widespread use of charters for trial committees. He is part of the faculty for UCL's regular 1-day course on Data Monitoring Committees in practice. Matt has served as a member of IDMCs and TSCs, often as chair, for more around 50 trials, attending around 200 meetings. Matt teaches on these topics on the UCL Institute of Clinical Trials and Methodology's MSc in Clinical Trials. He is supervising a number of PhD students in these areas of methodological priority.

 


 

Gareth Arthur

Session: NICE technologies guidance – future-proofing our methods

Gareth Arthur
Director of Strategy and Policy
NHS England

As Director of strategy and policy for specialised services, Gareth is responsible in NHS England & Improvement for providing strategic direction and policy development for specialised services i.e. directly commissioned services for rare and complex conditions. Gareth’s portfolio also covers for medicines and diagnostics policy, medicines access and pricing policy, and the genomics unit.

Before joining NHS England, Gareth was a senior civil servant in the Department of Health and Social Care, where he led on primary medical care, commissioning policy and NHS England sponsorship. Gareth first joined the Department in the strategy team. Gareth joined the Department of Health from Housing and Urban Team in HM Treasury.

Gareth is an economist by background. He has an MSc (Econ) in local economic development from LSE and has over 15 years’ experience as a member of Government Economic Service, working on housing & planning, transport, regeneration and regional policy.

 

 

 


 

Shahed Ahmad

Session: Tackling big killers

Shahed Ahmad
National Clinical Director for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention
NHS England

 


 

Mark Dayan

Session: The post-Brexit world

Mark Dayan
Policy Analyst and Head of Public Affairs
Nuffield Trust

Mark joined the Nuffield Trust in 2012 and works across the Policy and Communications teams, analysing health and social care policy and translating research for policymakers. He is currently leading work on the implications of leaving the European Union for the NHS, life sciences and social care. He has also looked at devolution, legislation, and comparative health care systems across the four countries of the UK. Mark is a graduate of the University of Oxford and has an MSc in Philosophy and Public Policy from the London School of Economics.

 


 

Ben Goldacre

Session: Follow the evidence – but where does it lead?

Ben Goldacre
Senior Clinical Research Fellow, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Services
University of  Oxford

Ben Goldacre is a doctor, researcher and author. His books including "Bad Science" have sold over 700,000 copies in 30 countries. He runs the DataLab at the University of Oxford, building tools and services from large health datasets, and advises government on better uses of data and technology. He leads various technology projects including OpenPrescribing.net, an open data explorer for NHS primary care prescribing with over 130,000 users a year; and TrialsTracker.net, an open tool that monitors clinical trial reporting performance.
https://www.phc.ox.ac.uk/team/ben-goldacre

 


 

Dr Eva Krockow

Session: Tackling big killers

Dr Eva Krockow
Department of Neuroscience, Psychology and Behavior
University of Leicester

Dr Eva Krockow is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Neuroscience, Psychology & Behaviour at the University of Leicester, and leads the Health & Wellbeing Research Strand. Eva’s research focuses on medical decision-making and public health communication. In particular, she studies risk perceptions underlying antibiotic treatment choices. Eva uses both quantitative and qualitative research methods, and much of her work draws on international samples. For example, she currently evaluates antimicrobial stewardship activities in Africa as Technical and Reporting Adviser for the Commonwealth Partnerships for Antimicrobial Stewardship (CwPAMS) programme. Eva is passionate about science communication and writes regular blogs for Psychology Today (https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/blog/stretching-theory).

 


 

Dr Sam Roberts

Session: Accelerated Access Collaborative – the big picture

Dr Sam Roberts
Chief Executive
Accelerated Access Collaborative

Samantha Roberts has recently been appointed as Chief Executive of the Accelerated Access Collaborative, the national umbrella organisation for health innovation, hosted in NHS England and NHS Improvement. 

She originally trained as a doctor and practiced medicine in South Africa, the UK, and Australia before undertaking an MBA and joining McKinsey and Company,  where she worked in a wide range of industries before specialising in healthcare.

After McKinsey she moved into the NHS as a senior manager at a large teaching hospital in London (UCLH) and a director in an Academic Health Sciences Centre and Network (UCLPartners). Before taking on the role of Director of Innovation, Research and Life Sciences at NHS England and NHS Improvement last year. 

Over the last five years she has become involved in research, working with health economic models to inform evidence-based policy, initially at the London School of Economics before moving to the University of Oxford to undertake a DPhil (PhD).

 


 

Fleur Chandler

Session: Follow the evidence – but where does it lead?

Fleur Chandler
Patient Advisory Board
Duchenne UK 

Fleur is a Health Economist with over 25 years’ experience in the pharmaceutical industry in global, regional and UK roles, leading teams in health economics and health outcomes evidence generation, with a strong track record in Health Technology Assessment.  Alongside her industry role, she sits on the Patient Advisory Board of Duchenne UK and chairs Project HERCULES, an innovative and collaborative patient driven project across industry, clinicians, academics and patient organisations, generating disease level evidence for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.  She brought her personal and professional experience together to create the vision and concept for Project HERCULES and to guide the evidence generation activity to ensure that potential treatments for DMD are not denied on the basis of an inadequate HTA evidence base. 

 


 

Fay McCracken

Session: Accelerated Access Collaborative – the big picture

Fay McCracken
Associate Director, Office for Market Access
NICE