Speakers

Sarah Byron

Session: NICE guidelines and standards for quality improvement: planning ahead for use in practice

Sarah Byron
Associate Director, Diagnostics Assessment Programme
NICE

Sarah is the Associate Director of the NICE Diagnostics Assessment programme and has a keen interest in the value of diagnostics to patients and the healthcare system. She is leading on work in genomics, precision medicine and AMR diagnostic technologies at NICE, and is also Chair of the Equality Group for the NICE Centre of Health Technology Evaluation. Prior to joining NICE, Sarah completed a PhD in Biochemistry with the University of Manchester and GlaxoSmithKline, and then spent time working in research and development at AstraZeneca.

Sir David Haslam

Session: Opening chair

Sir David Haslam
Chair
NICE

David Haslam is Chair of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). He is also past-President and past Chairman of Council of the Royal College of General Practitioners, past-President of the British Medical Association, a former vice-chairman of the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, visiting Professor in Primary Health Care at de Montfort University, Leicester, and Professor of General Practice at the University of Nicosia, Cyprus. He was a GP in Ramsey, Cambridgeshire, for over 35 years and has been an expert member of the NHS National Quality Board, and National Clinical Adviser to both the Care Quality Commission and the Healthcare Commission. He is a Director of the State Health Services Organisation in Cyprus.

He is a Fellow of the Royal College of GPs, a Fellow of the Faculty of Public Health, a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Educators, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine, and a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians.

He has written 13 books, mainly on health topics for the lay public and translated into 13 languages, and well over two thousand articles for the medical and lay press. In 2014 he was named by Debretts and the Sunday Times as one of the 500 most influential and inspirational people in the United Kingdom. He was awarded CBE in 2004 for services to Medicine and Health Care, knighted in 2018 for services to NHS Leadership, and has been awarded Honorary Doctorates by Birmingham University and the University of East Anglia.


 

Doris-Ann Williams MBE

Session: The long term plan for life sciences: managing the innovation pipeline

Doris-Ann Williams MBE
Chief Executive
BIVDA

 


 

Dr Paul Catchpole

Session: Faster to Market

Dr Paul Catchpole
Value and Access Director
Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry 

 


 

Professor Yvonne Doyle

Session: Prevention or pills?

Professor Yvonne Doyle
Regional Director London
Public Health England

Professor Yvonne Doyle joined PHE in December 2012. Yvonne Doyle qualified as a doctor and has worked in senior roles in the NHS and Department of Health, and in the academic and independent sectors. Since 2013 she provides leadership for health, prevention of ill health, health protection and reduction of inequalities at city-wide level to the population of London. Her recent international work on behalf of the Mayor of London has been to accelerate London’s ambition to become the healthiest and fairest global city. She has acted as an adviser to the WHO on Healthy Cities and has recently been appointed a Companion of the Order of the Bath for services to Public Health. As Regional Director for PHE London she ensures the quality, responsiveness and consistency of the services PHE centres provide. She also has an assurance role for emergency planning and response and is responsible for workforce development across the wider public health system.


 

Michael Seres

Session: Faster to Market

Michael Seres
Founder
11Health

Michael is the founder of 11Health, the world’s first smart care platform for focused on patients with long term chronic conditions who are connected to medical bags. He was diagnosed aged 12 with the incurable bowel condition Crohn's Disease. In late 2011 he became the 11th person to undergo a small bowel transplant in the UK at The Churchill Hospital in Oxford. More recently he is a two time cancer survivor.

Michael started blogging about his journey and is a published author and patient mentor. He was the co-Chair of NHS Digital Services User Council & helped implement the first skype clinics in UK.  In 2015 he was announced as Stanford Medicine X first Patient-in-Residence and is an Executive Board member. He in on the HIMMS UK Advisory Panel and part of US Health & Human Services advisory board in to data accessibility.


 

 

Professor Gillian Leng

Session: NICE: impact and future vision
Session chair: Driving quality improvement in care

Professor Gillian Leng
Deputy Chief Executive and Health and Social Care Director 
NICE

Professor Gillian Leng is the Deputy Chief Executive at NICE, the Director of Health and Social Care, and a visiting professor at King's College London.

Gillian trained in medicine at Leeds, and then spent several years researching the epidemiology of peripheral vascular disease at Edinburgh University. She was involved in the Cochrane Collaboration as it first became established,and still contributes as an editor to the EPOC Group (Effective Practice and Organisation of Care). She specialised in public health medicine, and worked as a consultant before moving to NICE in 2001.

At NICE, Gillian has been responsible for the initial set up and running of the clinical guidelines programme, for establishing the NICE implementation function, and for setting up NHS Evidence. More recently she has been responsible for the transfer of the National Prescribing Centre into NICE, for establishing the NICE accreditation programme, and for new work on Quality Standards across health and social care.

Gillian is also Director of the Health and Social Care Programme and since January 2015 is leading the public health team at NICE.


 

Simon Nicholson

Session: Prevention or pills?

Simon Nicholson
Strategy Value & Access Director
MSD

Simon joined MSD UK in 2006. 

Simon’s first role was Head of Partnership.  He then built an innovative Healthcare Service Business for the UK. He has also led the General Medicine Business Unit, within MSD in the UK before taking his current role as the Strategy Value and Access Director within MSD UK.


 

 

Dr Jayne Spink

Session: Bringing genomics to the clinical frontline

Dr Jayne Spink
CEO
Genetic Alliance UK

Jayne has more than a decade’s experience in the third sector (former CEO of the Tuberous Sclerosis Association and Director of Policy & Research with the Multiple Sclerosis Society. She has a BSc and PhD in Genetics with postdoctoral research experience. After leaving the bench, Jayne worked for the Department of Health in Clinical Quality, Ethics and Genetics and has served as an Associate Director for the Centre for Clinical Practice at NICE.

Jayne joined Genetic Alliance UK in April 2017, a UK charity and umbrella group comprised of 200 third sector organisations, that variously provide support, information and funding for research. Genetic Alliance UK is home to Rare Diseases UK which campaigns on behalf of all those affected by Rare Conditions, and SWAN UK, providing support to families affected by “syndromes without a name” which are of likely genetic origin.

 


 

Dr Steven Pearson

Session: NICE: impact and future vision

Dr Steven Pearson
President
Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER)

Steven D. Pearson, MD, MSc is the Founder and President of the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER), an independent non-profit organization that evaluates the evidence on the value of medical tests, treatments, and delivery system innovations to encourage collaborative efforts to improve patient care and control costs.  Prominent among its evidence reports are ICER reviews of new drugs that include full assessments of clinical and cost-effectiveness along with suggested “value-based price benchmarks” to inform policymakers and guide price and coverage negotiation. Dr. Pearson is a Lecturer in the Department of Population Medicine at Harvard Medical School and also serves as Visiting Scientist in the Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health. 


 

David Baghurst

Session: Faster to Market

David Baghurst
General manager
NIHR Office for Clinical Research Infrastructure (NOCRI) 

Dr David Baghurst has recently joined GMG as Director Research Programmes and is working with the RP and NOCRI teams. 

David has a DPhil in chemistry, MBA from Warwick and has worked as an academic (lecturer Imperial), industrial R&D manager (Cookson Group), business incubator developer and technology transfer manager (Oxford). David knows something about healthcare R&D, raising investment, business planning, IP, general management and doing business in Asia. 

He has been working with DH since 2009 and has been involved in several GMG tender exercises including the recent DH CCF and NOCRI retenders. 


 

 

Sir Andrew Dillon

Chair: On the front line of innovation - insights from the Cancer Drugs Fund and Early Access to Medicines Scheme

Sir Andrew Dillon
Chief Executive
NICE

Sir Andrew Dillon joined the NHS in 1975 and has held a number of senior management positions, including General Manager of the Royal Free Hospital and Chief Executive of St George's Healthcare NHS Trust. He joined the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence as its founding Chief Executive in 1999.


 

Dr Tessa Lewis

Session: Driving quality improvement in care

Dr Tessa Lewis
General Practitioner and medical adviser, Chair NICE Managing Common Infections Committee

Tessa has been a GP partner, Wales since 1995. As medical advisor, she led and supported the development of All Wales Medicines Strategy group therapeutic guidance (2005 – 2016), for example, the national antibiotic audit, national prescribing indicators and advice on the role of oral anticoagulants.

She has been involved in various NICE workstreams since 2011 including NICE Antimicrobial Stewardship guideline (Vice chair) and the safe use and management of controlled drugs (NG46 Chair). She is currently a member of NICE Quality Standards and Indicators Advisory Committees.   

She works with colleagues to support the awareness, discussion and implementation of NICE guidance to people ‘on the front line’.

She has particular interest in antimicrobial stewardship, polypharmacy, multimorbidity and medication review.


 

 

Dr Julian Treadwell

Session: NICE: impact and future vision

Dr Julian Treadwell
Julian Treadwell is a GP and is Chair of the NICE Connect-Pathways Committee and Co-moderator for the NICE GP reference panel.

He is also an NIHR Doctoral Research Fellow at the Nuffield Department of Primary Health Care Sciences in Oxford, researching novel ways to communicate clinical evidence to GPs.

 


 

Dr Samuel Finnikin

Session: Too much medicine? Getting the balance right

Dr Samuel Finnikin
Institute of Applied Health Research, Clinical Research Fellow
University of Birmingham

Dr Finnikin is a GP in Sutton Coldfield and a researcher at the University of Birmingham. He is interested in how we can better use shared decision making in practice to reduce unwarranted variation and the harms of overmedicalisation. He is a member of the RCGP Preventing Overdiagnosis group and a fellow for Evidence and Values with the college.


 

Shirley Cramer CBE

Session: NICE futures 

Shirley Cramer CBE
CEO
RSPH

Shirley has been the CEO of the Royal Society for Public Health since 2013. RSPH works across the UK and internationally to improve and protect the public’s health and wellbeing. She chairs the ‘People in UK Public Health’ advisory group, a cross government committee which advises on the future of the workforce for the public’s health and she is Vice Chair of the Public Health System Group in England. Prior to this she has been a CEO in education charities in both the USA and UK and a non – executive in the public and voluntary sectors. 

She is a member of the Global Advisory Board of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in the US and a Commissioner on the RSA Food, Farming and Countryside Commission. She chairs think tank, British Future and is a trustee of Alzheimer’s Research UK.

 

 

Carla Deakin

Session: Technology appraisals – fit for the future

Carla Deakin
Programme Director, Commercial & Managed Access
NICE

Originally a NHS biomedical scientist, Carla spent 25 years in the UK Diagnostics industry gaining both commercial and healthcare system experience in a variety of roles for a major global healthcare company. During this time, Carla was an active contributor in the UK laboratory diagnostics industry and professional body arena, where she held a number of industry wide posts including chair of the Executive Board of BIVDA (British In-Vitro Diagnostics Association) 2012 – early 2014.

Carla joined NICE in February 2014 as Associate Director for the Diagnostics Assessment Programme, focusing in particular on raising the awareness of NICE’s diagnostics activities with external stakeholders. In 2017, Carla became Associate Director for the NICE Office for Market Access and the Accelerated Access Collaborative Secretariat before her move to the role of Programme Director for the newly established Commercial & Managed Access Programme in September 2018. Carla holds an MSc in Health Economics and Health Policy from the University of Birmingham and was previously a Fellow of Institute of Biomedical Sciences.


 

Helen Scott

Session: Antimicrobial Resistance: Innovative models for the purchase of of antimicrobials in the UK

Helen Scott
Head of Medicines Access and Policy
NHS England

 

 

 

 

 


 

Alexia Tonnel

Session chair: There’s an NHS approved app for that: the journey from digital concept to deployment

Alexia Tonnel
Director of Evidence Resources

NICE

Alexia Tonnel is the director of Evidence Resources at NICE. She leads NICE’s digital services team as well as its information services function.

Alexia studied business and management in France after which she completed a Master of Science in International Accounting and Finance at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Before joining NICE, Alexia was a Director with Deloitte in London where she advised a range of clients in the healthcare and life science industries on policy and strategy development as well as large programme implementation.

 


 

Eric Low

Session: NICE futures

Eric Low
Independent Healthcare Consultant and former CEO of Myeloma UK

Eric has worked in the field of medical research charities for over 20 years. He founded Myeloma UK in 1996, leading the organisation as Chief Executive until 2017.

He currently runs a consultancy business specialising primarily in strategic market access, life sciences and healthcare policy and patient engagement.

Eric is committed and focused on improving patient outcomes and puts patients at the centre of everything he does. His goal is to have made a significant and material impact on the quality of life of patients and the prevention and curability of rare diseases. He has a strong track record of delivery and success in building multi-stakeholder research collaborations and consortia and in delivering innovative solutions to complex issues, challenges and barriers standing in the way of progress.

Eric is also a Senior Visiting Research fellow at the University of Leeds Medical School, and he holds several Board, honorary, advisory and voluntary positions. He also advises numerous medical and health-focused charities on a pro bono basis. He was awarded an OBE for services to charity in the Queen’s Birthday Honours 2012.

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Professor Graham Martin

Session: Driving quality improvement in care

Graham Martin
Director of Research
THIS Institute

Graham Martin is Director of Research for THIS Institute, a new unit funded by the Health Foundation at the University of Cambridge to develop the evidence base for and impact of work to improve healthcare quality and safety, and Professor of Health Organisation and Policy in the SAPPHIRE Group, University of Leicester. His research focuses on social, organisational and professional issues in healthcare system change, with a particular focus on quality improvement work and policy initiatives to address quality, safety and risk in the NHS.


 

Meindert Boysen

Session chair: Technology appraisals – fit for the future and Faster to Market

Meindert Boysen
Director, Centre for Health Technology Evaluation
NICE

Meindert is Director of the Centre for Health Technology Evaluation at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). He was previously responsible for running NICE’s technology appraisal and highly specialised technologies programmes, Meindert has a strong track record in health technology evaluation, occupying a senior technical and leadership role in NICE’s drug appraisal programme.

Before joining NICE in 2004 Meindert worked for Eli Lilly in the Netherlands, and for the King’s Fund in London after graduating with an MSc in Health Policy Planning and Financing from the London School of Economics & Political Sciences.

Meindert is currently on the Board of Directors for The International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR), 2017 – 2020 and is chair of the ISPOR Audit committee.


 

Sarah Hughes

Session: Delivering mental health care - fit for the future

Sarah Hughes
Chief Executive
Centre for Mental Health

Sarah has worked in mental health for 28 years and has been the Chief Executive at Centre for Mental Health for over a year now. Having initially trained as a social worker, Sarah has managed a range of innovative community and secure services. She also led the research and evaluation of the pioneering First Night in Custody project in Holloway Prison which saw the roll out of these principles across the prison estate supported by the Cabinet Office.

In recent years, Sarah has led Mind in Cambridgeshire (among other organisations) which is known for values led practice and high impact campaigns including Stop Suicide and StressLess. 

Sarah is also undertaking a professional doctorate with the Tavistock and Portman Centre studying Women, Resilience and Leadership. She writes a blog and has written many guest pieces for various platforms.

Sarah is passionate about the mental health of the nation and believes it is possible to achieve parity of esteem by drawing on the amazing work already being undertaken across the country. 

 


 

Emily Lam

Session: Reliable evidence?: The roles of real-world data, patient evidence and randomised trials in judging treatment effectiveness

Emily Lam
Lay member, Guidelines Committee
NICE

I have been supporting public and patient involvement in NICE guideline developments for a number of years. I am passionate about the potential contributions of patients and carers by taking an active role in sharing healthcare that affect them personally, and making an input in shaping research, as appropriate. This I believe is becoming ever more important in the context of our ageing population as demand is growing and threatening to outstrip resources. Public and patient's active participation in healthcare is a mutually beneficial process, on one hand this would empower patients and carers so that they increase their confidence and expertise in optimising patient outcomes in the community. On the other hand, the interested, participating patient is more likely to be working collaboratively with the clinical professionals towards treatment goals. Subsequently, less waste in resources and more cost effective care should result, helping the NHS to be sustainable. For the above reasons I would definitely continue to be involved and contribute what I can to the process for some time yet.


 

Blake Dark

Session: Technology appraisals – fit for the future

Blake Dark
NHS Commercial Medicines Director
NHS England

Blake is the Commercial Medicines Director for NHS England. He is NHS England’s chief negotiator with the pharmaceutical industry and SRO for the broader cross-organisational Medicines Value Program.

Blake‘s team oversee all commercial discussions with companies in relation to individual drugs:

  • Drugs that trigger the £20m budget impact test (BIT)
  • Commercial arrangements associated with the Cancer Drug Fund (CDF)
  • Commercial arrangements relating to NICE’s Highly Specialised Technology appraisal programme (HST)
  • Commercial arrangements relating to NHS England’s clinical policy process overseen by its Clinical Priorities Advisory Group (CPAG)

Blake also leads a procurement function relating to medicines used in secondary care; Commercial Medicines Unit (CMU).

Before joining NHS England in Oct 2018, Blake held senior roles in the pharmaceutical industry for 24 years at Sanofi. Blake has led both innovative pharma and generic businesses in the UK for 15 years and 9 years running innovative pharma businesses across multiple countries in Europe and as Commercial Operations Head for Sanofi’s global generic’s company.


 

 

Nicola Thorley

Session: NICE guidelines and standard for quality improvement: planning ahead for use in practice

Nicola Thorley
Consultant Sexual Health and HIV

University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust and NICE Fellow

Nicola is a consultant in HIV and sexual health and clinical lead for service development and evaluation within the Umbrella Sexual Health Service for Birmingham and Solihull. Her areas of special interest include service development, quality improvement through feedback, data collection and evaluation and healthcare professional education. She completed the postgraduate certificate in medical education in 2015. As a NICE Scholar in 2015, she utilized real-time monitoring to evaluate uptake of hepatitis B vaccination in at-risk groups.

She is currently clinical lead for the Umbrella Primary Care Subgroups for GPs and community pharmacists. She’s passionate about collaboration with community organisations to overcome traditional barriers between disciplines, destigmatise sexual health and HIV and improve patient care and experience. As a NICE Fellow, she will be focusing on increasing awareness and uptake of HIV testing, hepatitis B, hepatitis C and chlamydia screening in primary care, and improving awareness and uptake of contraception.


 

 

Nick Crabb

Session: Antimicrobial resistance: innovation models for the purchase of antimicrobials in the UK

Nick Crabb
Programme Director – Scientific Affairs
NICE

Nick had a 20 year career in analytical science, process technology and general management in the chemical, pharmaceutical and contract laboratory industries prior to joining NICE as the associate director for the Diagnostics Assessment Programme in 2010. Nick was responsible for the establishment and management of the programme. In 2014 Nick was appointed Programme Director for Scientific Affairs where he oversees NICE Scientific Advice, the Science Policy and Research programme and the NICE Office for Market Access.


 

Professor Clare Turnbull

Session: Bringing genomics to the clinical frontline

Professor Clare Turnbull
Professor of Genomic Medicine and the Clinical Lead for Cancer Genomics for the 100,000 Genomes Project,
Genomics England

Clare Turnbull is an academic clinician in the field of cancer susceptibility genomics, leading research teams at both the Institute of Cancer Research, London and Queen Mary University of London.

Since 2014, Clare has also been clinical lead for Cancer Genomics for Genomics England, involved in design and delivery of the 100,000 Genomes Project and the new NHSE Genomics Medicine Service and National genomics Information System.

Her research to date has focused primarily upon identification and characterisation of genomic factors related to cancer susceptibility.  She has recently initiated a £4.3 million CRUK funded program, CanGene-CanVar, to work with PHE to develop NHS data resources that improve clinical delivery and impact in cancer susceptibility genetics. She has lead the largest recruitment study of testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT) in the world and her group has identified the majority of common and rare susceptibility variants for TGCT.  She has also published extensively in genetic susceptibility to breast, ovarian and childhood cancers, including identification of RAD51D and RAD51C as susceptibility genes for ovarian cancer. 

Clare undertook her preclinical training in Cambridge and qualified in medicine from Oxford University.  She completed a PhD in Genetic Epidemiology at the Institute of Cancer Research, London and a Masters degree in Epidemiology and Statistics at the London School of Hygiene.  She undertook general medical training across hospitals in Oxford and London and specialist training in Clinical Genetics in London. Her clinical work at Guys and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust focuses on management of patients and families with genetic susceptibility to cancer.

 


 

Professor Carl Heneghan

Session: Reliable evidence?: roles of real-world data, patient evidence and randomised trials in judging treatment effectiveness

Professor Carl Heneghan
Director, Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences
University of Oxford

Professor of Evidence-Based Medicine at the Department of Primary Care Health Sciences at the University of Oxford, Director of the Centre for Evidence-¬Based Medicine, Editor in Chief of BMJ EBM and an NHS urgent care GP.
 
Carl is a clinical epidemiologist and a  world-leading expert in EBM and research methods.  He has extensive experience in systematic reviews and quantitative methodologies. led groundbreaking work, which notably includes the Tamiflu systematic reviews, and he is Director of a World Health Organization Collaboration Centre.
 
Carl's work also includes investigating the evidence base for drug and device regulation, advising governments on the regulatory and evidence requirements for devices and drugs and evidence-based projects in the public interest. He has worked with Panorama to examine the evidence for sports drinks and for IVF 'Add-on' treatments, and with channel 4 and the BMJ he exposed problems with metal-hips and is an advisor to the UK Gov’t APPG onSurgical Mesh, and the APPG on Hormone Pregnancy Tests
 
His international expertise in assessing evidence has been recognised by multiple global agencies including the WHO, US FDA and the UK government amongst others. He is one of the founders of the AllTrials campaign andas Director of the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (CEBM), which is dedicated to the practice, teaching and dissemination of high quality Evidence to inform clinical practice.


 

 

Dr Helen Macdonald

Session: Reliable evidence?: The roles of real-world data, patient evcidence and randomised trials in judging treatment effectiveness

Dr Helen Macdonald

UK research editor
The BMJ

Helen Macdonald graduated from Barts and The London Queen Mary's School of Medicine Dentistry, London (2006). She has worked as an editor at The BMJ since 2008 (beginning as an editorial registrar). Currently, she is the UK research editor, continues to develop The BMJ's Rapid Recommendations series, and champions aspects of our campaigns on Better Evidence and Too Much Medicine. She has previously headed the analysis and education sections of the journals, and supported the Student BMJ's editorial team.

After two years a junior doctor in London, she split her time between The BMJ and GP training until she qualified as a General Practitioner in 2014. Along the way she also did a BA in Medical Journalism (first class honours, University of Westminster) and MSc in Evidence-Based Healthcare (distinction, University of Oxford). It is blending all of these skills together, to communicate clear and helpful information for discussions about health and healthcare, which drives her work at The BMJ.

 

 

 

Dr Paul Chrisp

Session: Too much medicine? Getting the balance right

Dr Paul Chrisp
Director, Centre for Guidelines 
NICE

Paul has been with NICE since March 2009, where he was responsible for setting up the Institute’s accreditation programme for guideline developers, and more recently was Programme Director of the Medicines and Technologies Programme. Before joining NICE, Paul spent over 20 years in international medical publishing and communications, focusing on evidence to aid healthcare decision making and the adoption of new medicines. Paul trained as a pharmacist and is a member of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society.


 

Neelam Patel

Session: There’s an NHS approved app for that: the journey from digital concept to deployment

Neelam Patel
Chief Operating Officer
MedCity

Neelam is COO of MedCity, a small organisation set up to support the growth of the life sciences sector within the Greater South East of England. Neelam supports the CEO and Board in driving the strategic direction of the group as well as being the lead advisor for clinical trials and supporting companies to connect to the right expertise and infrastructure to grow.  Neelam also supports DigitalHealth.London (of which MedCity is a founding partner) and its Accelerator, to simplify the landscape for digital health innovators in generating evidence.

Neelam has had a number of leadership roles in Pharma and she has used her industry experience to lead and progress projects in the not-for-profit sector as well as the National Institute of Health Research.

 


 

Dr Roshelle Ramkisson

Session: Driving quality improvement in care

Dr Roshelle Ramkisson,
Psychiatry Programme Director, North West
Health Education England

Dr Roshelle Ramkisson is a Child and adolescent Psychiatrist and Lead Consultant based in Oldham, Greater Manchester. She has interests in ADHD and Emotional Disorders in children and adolescents. She is former NICE scholar and has a senior lead role in Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust in embedding Quality Improvement in her portfolio as the Associate Director of Medical Education. She also has a regional education roles as a Post-graduate Training Programme Director with Health Education North West. 

She is a Research Fellow and an Honorary Senior Lecturer working at the University of Manchester and an Honorary Research Consultant at Lancashire Care NHS Foundation Trust Consultant in Global Mental Health with a focus on adolescent self-harm, suicide prevention and wider public health interventions to address the mental health needs in children and adolescents. 


 

 

Sam Barnett-Cormack

Session: Too much medicine? Getting the balance right

Sam Barrett-Cormack
Patient Advocate & Expert Patient

With a background in computer and social sciences, Sam's involvement as an expert patient was first driven by his own experience as a much-diagnosed person. With a diverse collection of conditions, and experience of working with and representing the chronically ill and disabled community to engage in public policy, he found himself a natural fit for developing the NICE Guideline on Multimorbidity. These experiences have also led him to writing opportunities, including contributions to Social Policy First Hand (Policy Press, 2018) and a themed issue of the European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy on deprescribing (Eur J Hosp Pharm 2017;24(1):34-36), and other opportunities to support health professionals in understanding the patient experience.

Mirella Marlow

Session chair: The long term plan for life sciences: managing the innovation pipeline

Mirella Marlow
Programme Director, Centre for Health Technology Evaluation
NICE

Mirella Marlow is responsible for NICE’s programmes that evaluate and develop guidance on medical devices, diagnostics and interventional procedures.  She works with industry, health services, government policymakers, life sciences organisations and researchers to maximise the effectiveness of NICE’s work in these areas.   Mirella joined NICE in 2004, having previously worked for 15 years as a commissioner in the NHS. She has an MBA and a Masters in Medical Ethics and Law from Keele University. Her interests in medical ethics include measuring cost-effectiveness of interventions to improve safety in healthcare, and incorporating ethical considerations into HTA. 


 

Sheryl Warttig

Session: The long term plan for life sciences: managing the innovation pipeline

Sheryl Warttig 
Senior Technical Adviser – Centre for Health Technology 
NICE

Sheryl Warttig is a senior technical adviser in NICE’s Centre for Health Technology Evaluation. Sheryl is leading the delivery of HealthTech Connect- a national, systematic approach for identifying and supporting health technologies including devices, diagnostics, apps, and wearables. HealthTech Connect will be used by NICE, NHS England, and other UK healthcare decision makers as a fundamental component of topic selection processes.

Sheryl is also responsible for company engagement in the NICE Medical Technologies Evaluation Programme (MTEP). MTEP considers innovative medical technologies for the development of NICE guidance, and Medtech Innovation Briefings (NICE advice). At October 2018, the outputs include over 68 pieces of NICE guidance and over 156 pieces of NICE advice.

Sheryl joined NICE in 2011 after having previously worked in the NHS.  Sheryl has also worked in the NICE Clinical Guidelines Programme and the NICE Safe Staffing Programme.

 


 

Mark Salmon

Session: There’s an NHS approved app for that: the journey from digital concept to deployment

Mark Salmon
Programme Director Information Resources
NICE

Mark Salmon is Deputy Director Evidence Resources and Programme Director Information Resources at NICE and joined the organisation in 2001.  He is part of the NICE team that developed the NICE’s Evidence Standards Framework for Digital Health Technologies published on the NICE website in March 2019 and part of the team that developed a series of pilot NICE Health App Briefings published in November 2017.  He is currently working on establishing a new pilot medical technology evaluation programme for digital health technologies at NICE.  


 

 

Colm Leonard

Session: Antimicrobial resistance: innovation models for the purchase of antimicrobials in the UK

Colm Leonard
Consultant Thoracic/Transplant Physician & Honorary Senior Lecturer; Consultant Clinical Adviser
University Hospital of South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust; NICE

Dr Leonard is a Consultant Thoracic Physician in Manchester since October 2000 and is an Honorary Senior Clinical Lecturer at The University of Manchester. Since 2008 Dr Leonard spends part of his week on secondment to the Centre for Health Technology Evaluation at NICE, which involves assessing which novel pharma and MedTech products will benefit from a NICE assessment. 
 
Dr Leonard went to Medical School at the University of Dublin, Trinity College, graduating in 1991. In 1995 Dr Leonard was awarded a British Council Research Fellowship grant for a project on the immunology of T cell responses in Asthmatics, supervised from the Royal Free Hospital, and winning an ACCP Young Investigator award for this work. In 1997 Dr Leonard went to California on a three-year fellowship in Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine at Stanford University Medical Center, subspecialising in severe lung disease and lung transplantation. Dr Leonard joined the Stanford faculty after his fellowship but was recruited to Manchester in October 2000 to take up the post of Consultant Thoracic Physician & lead physician for lung transplantation & interstitial lung disease. Dr Leonard’s experience includes basic science research, animal model work, clinical trials and his horizon scanning work with NICE is across all specialties. 
 
A significant amount of Dr Leonard’s time with NICE in the past 3 years has been spent with colleagues in NICE, DHSC and NHS England working towards a novel value assessment of new antimicrobials. 

 

Richard Vize

Conference chair

Richard Vize
Director
Public Policy Media Ltd

Richard Vize (@RichardVize) has been a commentator on public policy and public services reform for over 25 years. He is a columnist for the Guardian Healthcare Network, contributes to the British Medical Journal and works with a range of organisations across health and local government.

Richard is a former editor of both Health Service Journal and Local Government Chronicle, and was head of communications at regulator Ofsted. He and his teams have won a number of awards.

He is a trustee of the whistleblowing charity Public Concern at Work. Richard’s passions are photography, independent travel and political history.


Leslie Galloway

Session: Technology appraisals – fit for the future

Leslie Galloway
Chairman
Ethical Medicines Industry Group 

Leslie built a successful career over 40 years in senior management roles in both the pharmaceutical and medical device industries, culminating in the successful turnaround of a pharmaceutical business.

He was elected EMIG Chairman in 2005 and has been instrumental in the metamorphosis of EMIG from being a business/networking group to the influential trade association it is today. In 2005, EMIG began with 17 Member Companies and today, has 300+, of which, 90% choose to be represented only by EMIG. Consequently, EMIG represents c. 50% of UK branded medicines.

In July 2014, Leslie was elected VP, European Confederation of Pharmaceutical Entrepreneurs (EUCOPE). He was Vice Chairman of the NICE Project Development Group for Local Formularies Good Practice Guidance, a member of the NICE Medicines Optimisation Guidance Development Group and is an Expert Adviser to the NICE Centre for Clinical Practice.

He was a member of the Accelerated Access Review Reference Group and a member of the Cancer Drugs Fund Working Group. He has published numerous articles, is a frequent speaker at national and international seminars, a Member of the Scottish Government’s Strategic Engagement Group, a Member of MENSA and is a visiting lecturer at the University of Cambridge.

 


 

Dr Asma Khalil

Session: There’s an NHS approved app for that: the journey from digital concept to deployment

Dr Asma Khalil
Consultant Obstetrician
St George’s Hospital London

Asma Khalil is a Professor of Obstetrics at St George’s Hospital, University of London. She is a subspecialist in Maternal and Fetal Medicine. She gained her MD at the University of London in 2009. She also has a Masters degree in Epidemiology from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and an MRC scholarship.

She has published more than 150 peer reviewed papers, and many published review articles and chapters. She was awarded many research prizes, both at national and international meetings.

She is passionate about innovation. She is the inventor of the HAMPTON, which is an award-winning digital innovation which enables pregnant women to monitor their blood pressure safely at home. She is a National Innovation Accelerator (NIA) Fellow.

She is committed to the implementation of clinical guidelines in practice and believes that they could reduce inequalities in care across the NHS. She is an Expert Advisor to NICE. She chairs the Steering Committee of the Maternity Engagement Project to improve the outcomes of multiple pregnancies. She has active collaborations with international societies, particularly in developing countries.


 

 

Gareth Arthur

Session: Prevention or pills?

Gareth Arthur
Director of Strategy and Policy for Specialised Services
NHS England

As director of strategy and policy for specialised services, Gareth is responsible in NHS England & Improvement for providing strategic direction and policy development for specialised services i.e. directly commissioned services for rare and complex conditions. Gareth’s portfolio also covers for medicines and diagnostics policy, medicines access and pricing policy, and the genomics unit.

Before joining NHS England, Gareth was a senior civil servant in the Department of Health and Social Care, where he led on primary medical care, commissioning policy and NHS England sponsorship. Gareth first joined the Department in the strategy team. Gareth joined the Department of Health from Housing and Urban Team in HM Treasury.

Gareth is an economist by background. He has an MSc (Econ) in local economic development from LSE and has over 15 years’ experience as a member of Government Economic Service, working on housing & planning, transport, regeneration and regional policy.

 

 

 


 

Conference Chair: Dr Phil Hammond

Conference Chair

Dr Phil Hammond

Dr Phil Hammond can talk seriously or humorously, and usually both, about any health and lifestyle topic. He has been an NHS doctor for 31 years, a comedian for 29 years, a BBC broadcaster for 28 years and Private Eye’s medical correspondent for 26 years. He qualified as a doctor in 1987, was a part time GP for 20 years, spent 5 years in sexual health and currently works in an NHS team helping young people with chronic fatigue. Phil presented five series of Trust Me, I’m a Doctor on BBC2, and has appeared many times on Have I Got News For You, the News Quiz, the Now Show and Countdown.

Phil has been a Lecturer in Medical Communication at the Universities of Birmingham and Bristol. As a journalist, he broke the story of the Bristol heart scandal in 1992, and gave evidence to the subsequent Public Inquiry. In 2012, Phil and Andrew Bousfield were shortlisted for the Martha Gellhorn Prize for investigative journalism for their Private Eye special report on the shocking treatment of NHS whistle-blowers, Shoot the Messenger. He has twice been named in the top 100 NHS Clinical Leaders by the Health Service Journal, and was voted Teacher of the Year by the medical students of Birmingham University.

Phil has presented his own BBC Radio Bristol show for 11 years, combining health, hope and happiness. With David Spicer, he has written 5 series of the medico-political satire ‘Polyoaks’ for Radio 4, and five books including ‘Staying Alive’ and ‘Sex, Sleep or Scrabble?.’ Phil was half of the award-winning comedy junior doctor double act Struck Off and Die with Tony Gardner, and has done four UK solo comedy tours, teaching audiences how to pleasure themselves sensibly and take the pressure off the NHS. His new show, ‘Happy Birthday NHS?’ celebrates its 70th birthday and provides a road map for its salvation. It tours in 2018.


 

Nicola Bent

Session chair: NICE guidelines and standards for quality improvement: planning ahead for use in practice

Nicola Bent
Programme Director, System Engagement
NICE

Nicola Bent is the Programme Director for System Engagement at NICE with responsibility for the Institute’s strategic engagement activities at a regional and local level. She also provides support for the NICE Implementation Strategy for NICE guidance, standards and advice.

Nicola is a registered member of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain and has a wealth of experience at a national, regional and local level having worked across the NHS for the past 20 years in a variety of roles.

 


 

Deborah O'Callaghan

Session: NICE guidelines and standards for quality improvement: planning ahead for use in practice

Deborah O'Callaghan
Implementation consultant
NICE

Deborah O’Callaghan is the Associate Director of the NICE Field Team in the Midlands and East.  She is also the Sector Lead for Public Health.  Working with health and care systems and organisations, her role is to support the use NICE guidance and Quality Standards to achieve high quality care and improvements in health and wellbeing.  Deborah is committed to collaborating with partner organisations including other national bodies to ensure a cohesive package of support is available to organisations across the region.

Deborah has worked at NICE for 10 years, prior to which she held a variety of strategy, redesign and quality improvement roles within the NHS and social care sector.  More recent posts include Associate Director of Strategic Development in a London PCT and Director of a London Cardiac Network.


 

 

Joe Hassell

Session: NICE guidelines and standard for quality improvement: planning ahead for use in practice

Dr Joe Hassell 
Audley Health Centre

Joe is in his final year of GP training at Audley Health Centre in North Staffordshire.  He qualified from the University of Leeds in 2013 and has an interest in medical education.


 

 

Dr Sam Roberts

Session: The long term plan for life sciences: managing the innovation pipeline

Dr Samantha Roberts
Director of Innovation, Research and Life Sciences Group
NHS England

Samantha Roberts has recently been appointed as NHS England's Director of Innovation and Life Sciences.

She originally trained as a doctor and practiced medicine in South Africa, the UK, and Australia before joining McKinsey and Company where she worked in a wide range of industries before specialising in healthcare.

After McKinsey she moved into the NHS as a senior manager at a large teaching hospital in London (UCLH) and a director in an Academic Health Sciences Centre and Network (UCLPartners).

Over the last five years she has become involved in research, working with health economic models to inform evidence-based policy, initially at the London School of Economics before moving to the University of Oxford to undertake a DPhil (PhD).

 


 

Dr Jennifer Dixon

Session: Towards a learning health care system: accelerating the uptake of innovation and best practice – Dr Jennifer Dixon, Chief Executive, Health Foundation
In conversation with Richard Vize

Dr Jennifer Dixon
Chief Executive
Health Foundation

Dr Jennifer Dixon joined the Health Foundation as Chief Executive in October 2013.

Jennifer was Chief Executive of the Nuffield Trust from 2008 to 2013. Prior to this, she was Director of Policy at The King’s Fund and was the policy advisor to the Chief Executive of the NHS between 1998 and 2000.

Originally trained in medicine, Jennifer practised mainly paediatric medicine prior to a career in policy analysis. She has undertaken research and written widely on health care reform both in the UK and internationally.

Jennifer has led two national inquiries for government: on the setting up of published ratings of quality of NHS and social care providers in England (2013); and on the setting up of ratings for general practices (2015). She was also a member of the Parliamentary Review Panel for the Welsh Assembly Government advising on the future strategy for the NHS and social care in Wales (2017-2018).